In counseling, Eating Disorders, Empowerment, Inspirational, mental illness, recovery

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Recovery from an eating disorder requires an incredibly courageous step into the unknown. It requires relinquishing control and moving through the stages of change to reach acceptance and health. This is easier said than done and takes time. One of the first steps is identifying what purpose the eating disorder serves and therefore what emotional needs it is meeting. Only then can the person begin to find healthy ways to meet those needs and heal.

What is the Function?

Very often, people with eating disorders find themselves in life circumstances that leave them feeling like they’ve lost control. Maybe there’s been trauma or a loss, or maybe bullying at school or a lack of identity. The eating disorder swoops in at these vulnerable times, offering a lifeline in the form of a sense of power and control, a numbing of painful emotions, something to feel accomplished about….a savior that ends up creating devastation and life-threatening complications.

Stages of Change

Moving beyond resistance and denial to contemplation and action feels impossible when the eating disorder is in full swing. Many people arrive at treatment at the urging of family and friends without the slightest idea themselves of why they are there. The stages of change put a timeline to this process, and it is possible to envision when one might arrive at identifying and challenging the purpose the eating disorder serves.

Precontemplation: People in this stage tend to be resistant to change. They are in treatment for others. They feel hopeless.

Contemplation: Recognizes there’s a problem (and perhaps now is aware of the purpose the eating disorder serves) and begins to anticipate an imminent change.

Preparation: People sometimes experience ambivalence in this stage as they prepare for change but still aren’t 100% convinced it’s a good idea.

Action: Time and energy are committed. Behaviors begin to change.

Maintenance: Continued action is required to maintain recovery. It is a fluid process with frequent adjustments.

Letting Go

A person in the throes of an eating disorder truly believes that the illness brings value to their life. It likely has shown merit at some point, in the form of the purpose it serves in the person’s life. For example, someone who has experienced life in an alcoholic home may now feel in control for once….amid all that chaos, the eating disorder created a way for the person to feel competent, in control, and superior. In this case, the eating disorder creates control where there was chaos and a false sense of self-esteem where there was self-hate and uncertainty. It becomes difficult to build a case against the eating disorder when it has brought some semblance of order to the person’s life. Recovery begins when the person recognizes the purpose served and can accept that what once felt like control has now become out of control and not sustainable. An article by Emily Troscianko (2010) poignantly states: “Somewhere along this road….You may come to see that exerting control is simply no longer what’s required of you.” Letting go catalyzes action, and action leads to recovery.

Troscianko, E. (2010). Why Control Won’t Bring You Happiness. Psychology Today, www.psychologytoday.com

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